October 2020 SAGE Newsletter

ROAD RALLY
“COME OUT AND DRAG MAIN”

As a way to support the center and celebrate our community, we are hosting a road rally on October 11, National Coming Out Day!  There are some details below, but visit https://utahpridecenter.org/pride-and-center/road-rally/road-rally-lets-get-started to register and get more information. 

We need your help to make sure that the Utah Pride Center is able to continue the life saving work we do for our community.  

Sunday, October 11th (National Coming Out Day)
9:00 Rendezvous
10:00 Road Rally Begins

Starting at 14 Wasatch Locations (See Map)
Finishing in Downtown Salt Lake City (See Map)

Family, Friends, Co-Workers, Everyone!

A Covid-19 Safe EventLive & In-Person or Watch Virtually

A – Come Out of Your House & Have Fun!
B – Help Support the Utah Pride Center
C – Celebrate National Coming Out Day

1 – Register Your Team in 1 of 10 Road Rally Classes (Categories)
2 – Invite Your Friends to Support Your Team
3 – Decorate Your Vehicle (if you choose)
4 – Rendezvous with us at 1 of 14 locations (See Map)
5 – Follow your location’s pace car and caravan to downtown SLC
6 – Come Out & Drag Main Street with us safely within your vehicle (See Map)

A – Road Rally Participation Rules (See Here)
B – Covid-19 Safety Requirements (See Here)
Can’t wait to see you all!  Click here to register for the Road Rally.  https://utahpridecenter.org/pride-and-center/road-rally/road-rally-lets-get-started

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY

Saturday, October 3rd @2pm (MST) The
Utah Pride Center
and
Tracy Aviary’s Jordan River Nature Center
invite you to the Trash Picker Social to show some love for the Jordan River and relax with friends new and old! LGBTQIA+ folks and our allies are invited to participate in a socially-distanced litter clean-up along the Jordan River Trail, then relax at the Jordan River Nature Center while enjoying lemonade and cookies. Register at the link below, see you there!
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/trash-picker-social-tickets-122479823449?utm-medium=discovery&utm-campaign=social&utm-content=attendeeshare&aff=esfb&utm-source=fb&utm-term=listing&fbclid=IwAR1asLw18N26P7RRrCetGT98xJcDbVkia1tn1UZqpuRiPtDeBA0G1tnkM9Q

Thank you to Nick Arteaga, UPC Program Coordinator for creating this partnership and event!  

ADULT PROGRAM CALLS

Join us on our calls – there’s a little something for everyone!
SAGE DAILY CALL 6:30 – 7:30 PMSchedule: 
Monday – Ted Talks
Tuesday – Walking Tours
Wednesday – Book Club
Thursday – Trivia Night
TEAMS MEETING

MEN’S SACK LUNCH – WEEKLY ON WED, 12:00 – 1:30 PM
TEAMS MEETING

SAGE SUPPER CLUB – 6:30 – 7:30 PM MONTHLY, 3RD FRIDAY
TEAMS MEETING

SAGE SOCIAL GROUP – 1:00 – 2:30 PM MONTHLY ON THE 2ND TUESDAY
TEAMS MEETING

OGDEN SAGE – 2:00 – 4:00 PM MONTHLY ON THE 3RD SUNDAY
TEAMS MEETING

ADULT PROGRAM CALLS – MONDAY & WEDNESDAY 5:30 – 6:30 PM
Join Google Meet:
video:
meet.google.com/iwp-xogm-ojh
Phone:
(US) +1 219-281-4189
PIN: 545648573 

INSPIRATION STATION

THE OLD WOMAN AND HER CAR… 

She won’t buy a new car until she has worn her old one out and it is still in new condition, after all it was only 84 years old (the car that is, oh, the lady at the time this video was made was 101).  

This lady’s car is a 1930 Packard.  

What a pleasant and spry lady she was…!  

Take note in the video that she lays a shop rag on the running board to step onto when she gets in and out of the car.   Then after she is in the car, she leans all the way down to the running-board to get the rag.  

She was in great physical and mental shape for her age.  

The car is not bad either…!  

Click on the link below to view this beautiful car and listen to this wonderful, seemingly ageless woman.  

http://www.youtube.com/embed/ qxCpK1W_Gjw?feature=player_ embedded

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Quote: Don't cry over the past, it's gone. Don't stress about the future, it hasn't arrived. Live in the present and make it beautiful. Author unknown.

RELIGIOUS TRAUMA PROCESS GROUP

The Religious Trauma Process group will be a hybrid psychoeducational group/open process group for LGBTQ+ adults, 18 and up, with anxiety, identity issues, and trauma compounded by association with religion, whether it be culturally or spiritually. The group will consist of 8 sessions, with each session being 90 minutes in length. The first 2 sessions will be open and the remaining 6 will be closed. The program will be developmental and will provide individuals with skills acquisition based on CBT/DBT with a feminist orientation. The group will utilize CBT/DBT with particular attention to LGBTQ+ specific concerns, i.e., internalized homophobia, and familial issues. This group is open to anyone 18+ who self-identifies as LGBTQ+. Additionally, further criteria include depression/anxiety or trauma/abuse, internalized homophobia, and marginalization resulting from religion, whether you are practicing or not, or are unsure of their relationship with religion. If you have any questions/concerns, feel free to reach out to the group facilitator at annelisemurphy@utahpridecenter.org. We want you to be a part of this group, and our goal is to make sure this group is a safe space for all participants. We use the information you give us to help determine if the group will meet your needs. After completing this form, the group facilitator will send a trauma assessment through email and reach out to you for a 10-minute phone conversation. Please note that all information collected is confidential.  

Please select this link to register (link)

https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=svWWKgk_Zk6glBnRGPiyOjf73jIgl11Ats0Bsv8PjuhUNEpTRUpUUVNCOFAyUkVPWTBWQjRMMFhRUS4u

JOE REDBURN TRIBUTE
(WRITTEN BY: SEAN MEANS, SALT LAKE TRIBUNE)

Joe Redburn, the founder of two iconic Salt Lake City gay bars who brought the beer for what became the first Utah Pride celebration, has died.

Redburn died Tuesday, Sept. 22, at the Men’s Resource Center in South Salt Lake City, according to the LGBTQ magazine Q Salt Lake, which first reported his death. He was 82. The magazine said officials had not released a cause of death.

“He wasn’t just a bar owner. He built our community and kept us safe,” said Roy Li Zhang, chairperson of the Utah Queer Historical Society. “Joe really brought our community together with these bars. They really were our social clubs.”

“Joe had great ideas. He was very progressive,” Nikki Boyer, a longtime activist and friend of Redburn, said.

In 1973, Redburn opened The Sun at the corner 400 West and South Temple, facing the Union Pacific station. (The spot is now the northwest steps of Vivint Smart Home Arena.)

Redburn was inspired by the Midnight Sun, a gay bar in San Francisco, Boyer said. The Sun, she said, “was like the first disco in Utah. It had the first disco ball, the first live DJs. … It was about all the freedom we had there. It was a good time. It was a great time.”

Former Utah state Sen. Jim Dabakis had just left Brigham Young University, and was just coming out of the closet, when he first visited The Sun in the mid-’70s.

“I remember being overwhelmed that this was possible,” Dabakis said. At the time, he thought, “Are there this many gay people in the whole world?”

Dabakis also knew Redburn from listening to him as a host on talk-radio station KTKK, aka K-TALK. Redburn was a fixture there from the late-’60s until the station let him go in 1993. Station brass said they let him go because of a format change; Redburn said it was because he was openly gay and a liberal on an increasingly conservative medium. (In his final years on the station, Redburn was paired with arch-conservative Mills Crenshaw.)

Dabakis said he gravitated toward K-TALK, and ended up working as an unpaid intern there. Listening to Redburn, he said, “is really where I learned politics.” Dabakis also rang doorbells in the Avenues for Redburn, when he made an unsuccessful run for the Utah Legislature in 1976.

In 1975, Redburn, Boyer and others organized a party in City Creek Canyon for about 300 gay men and lesbians. Redburn brought some kegs from the bar.

“Queers like to drink beer, let’s face it,” Boyer said. “We were loose. It was the ’70s, for God’s sake.”

That kegger started a tradition that grew into the first Utah Pride celebration. At the time, though, Boyer said, “we didn’t dare call it ‘Pride,’ or nobody would have come.”

The Sun moved in 1983 to its second location, at 200 South and 700 West. Redburn sold The Sun in 1990. In 1991, he opened a small, homey gay country-western bar, The Trapp, at 600 West and 100 South.

“It was the place to be,” said Johnny Harris, known locally as Johnny Disco, a longtime bartender at The Trapp. “If you weren’t there by 6:30 or 7 o’clock, there wasn’t a bar stool to be had.”

In The Trapp, Harris said, “there was this amazing energy. It was classy, and clean. It was a beautiful place to be.”

A focal point of The Trapp, recalled Debbie Hall, director of adult programs at the Utah Pride Center, was the tiny dance floor. Above the floor, instead of a mirrored disco ball, was a mirrored pair of cowboy boots.

Redburn sold The Trapp in the late ’90s. When The Sun blew over in a tornado in 1999, the new owners of The Trapp paid homage by renaming their bar The Sun Trapp.

In the last few years, friends knew Redburn had financial and health problems, and was experiencing homelessness at the time of his death.

“He just kind of dropped off the face of the earth,” Boyer said.

Redburn’s death, Hall said, points to a troubling issue in the LGBTQ community: the loneliness experienced by elderly queer people.

LGBTQ people are twice as likely to be aging alone as non-LGBTQ people, Hall said — and four times as likely to never have gotten married or had children.

“We are dealing with the generation where it was not OK to be gay,” said Hall, who oversees the Utah chapter of SAGE, a group for elderly queer people. They are a generation, she said, that has dealt with discrimination and ostracism, having their homosexuality treated as a mental disorder, and the deaths of friends during the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s.

Harris said a memorial service is being planned for Redburn in November at The Sun Trapp.

Thank you for all you did Joe – Rest In Power friend 

IF YOU ARE STRUGGLING, FEEL ALONE OR NEED SOMEONE TO TALK TO, WE ARE HERE TO HELP YOU.

The Utah Pride Center’s Community Counseling practices an affirmative approach to psychotherapy, working with our young and older folks to uncover their interpersonal concerns within the context of their gender identity or sexual orientation.

Our affirmative and supportive approach involves a strong focus on the therapeutic alliance, with therapists serving as advocates for the client and being mindful of the LGBTQ+ experience. Using this developmental, evidence-based and culturally sensitive understanding, our therapists engage in a meaningful and queer supportive approach.

If you need help, please email therapy@utahpridecenter.org and you will be contacted on how to begin.  We are here for you.

COVID-19 and Food Access 

As Utah responds to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, Utahns Against Hunger will be collecting and maintaining information on emergency food resources in the state. Click “Learn More” below to view the links for help.

We and all our partners are working hard to provide up to date information, but we are responding to a dynamic situation and circumstances at any given site are subject to change. Please call any service provider before visiting to make sure they are best able to help.

  • Utah Community Action will be providing meals to children 18 and under at their Head Start locations. Meals are available Monday through Friday from 10:30 am to 1:00 pm at these sites.
  • For the families of first responders and essential healthcare workers: Utah has created a childcare program aimed at assisting workers in these industries during the COVID-19 response.  

If you need help beyond food assistance or benefits: contact United Way, either at the 2-1-1 Utah website or by phone at 801-736-8929.

Learn More

WHAT IS IT LIKE TO BE A GAY MAN WHO HAS A FATHER THAT IS A LATTER DAY SAINT APOSTLE?

Meet Matthew Gong, a gay Mormon who reflects on his journey from inner war to inner peace.

This is a safe link to a very candid Salt Lake Tribune story.

https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.sltrib.com%2Freligion%2F2020%2F09%2F27%2Flds-apostles-gay-son%2F%3Ffbclid%3DIwAR1mI0Eejvi1FvsO7NkRNsBPByrqT5PzUAy48VzjImLaxQRtFGtNvTlcTwQ&h=AT3XjGigV63NVIsLW8Wd7FnoxbYa2ISWj9CPfyRs5Tt8D4XcmidXeLiO8duO0b6hiCNUN1a_vAZeLG_ps7BFVrK8hJXieC4XzH0hIG3b4KuAj34KTLEYcwrtBYYMDnjEXK8

International Pronouns Day is October 21st!

Each year, International Pronouns Day (IPD) takes place on the third Wednesday of October, and that’s October 21st this year. This is a grassroots effort, so what this day is and becomes depends on what you do with it. Adapt it as needed to your context, language, and local priorities.

As an individual, here are a few things you could do this year:

1. Educate yourself, and practice on your own. Visit MyPronouns.org and deepen your learning. Be sure you know how to respect others’ pronouns. Practice using they/them and other pronoun sets in sentences on your own, so you can do better in real life scenarios. Learn how to recover from mistakes.

2. Follow our social media (links in the footer of this message). Use the #PronounsDay hashtag on October 21st to show your support. Share why this matters to you. Be prepared to educate others. (Just remember, you don’t have to engage the trolls! Focus on people who want to learn.)

3. Share your own pronouns in your display name, in your email signature, when you share your name in meetings, etc.

4. Get involved in local communities and organizations. Donate to a local trans organization, and prioritize support for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color organizations. Work to get the organizations you work with to support International Pronouns Day.

THANK YOU RUTH BADER GINSBURG

Here is a link to a great article from the NY Times. 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/18/us/ruth-bader-ginsburg-dead.html?auth=link-dismiss-google1tap

THANK YOU FOR A LIFETIME OF SERVICE
MAY YOU REST IN PEACE

AGING AND ADULT SERVICES
SALT LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY PARTNER

The senior centers around Utah are still closed, but the programs have continued.  There are many classes to join – virtually of course, but that is our world right now.  There is also a wonderful newsletter called The Senior Scoop that has a lot of useful information.  Thanks to our friends from Salt Lake County Aging and Adult Services who continue to make these SAFE links to follow.  While these events are not specifically LGBTQ, we are very happy to have SL County as a long time partner and advocate of LGBTQ+ seniors.

https://slco.org/aging-adult-services/

https://slco.org/globalassets/1-site-files/aging–adult-services/newsletter.pdf

A WIN IS A WIN!
CALIFORNIA GOVERNOR SIGNS FOUR LGBTQ RIGHTS BILLS

California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) signed four pro-LGBTQ bills into law this past Friday, including one that expands protections for transgender people in prison.

“California has some of the strongest pro LGBTQ+ laws in the nation and with the bills signed today, our march toward equality takes an additional step forward,” Newsom said in a statement about the bevy of bills.

SB 132 requires the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation will now be required to ask inmates about their gender identities and pronouns and house them accordingly. This comes just months after a federal judge ruled that calling a transgender person by their correct pronouns would show bias.

State Sen. Scott Wiener (D), who introduced it, said the bill is “life-saving legislation that will protect trans people in prison, particularly trans women who are subject to high levels of assault and harassment in men’s facilities.”

The governor also signed SB 932, a bill that will require the state to collect information about LGBTQ people and the COVID-19 pandemic.

This bill was also introduced by state Sen. Wiener, who said that it “ensures our community will no longer be invisible, and that we will be counted by our public health system.”

AB 2218, which Newsom also signed, creates a Transgender Wellness and Equity Fund in the state, which will go towards helping transgender, non-binary, and intersex individuals access housing and health care.

“This is a critical measure for our transgender community and I thank Governor Newsom for his steadfast leadership in signing AB 2218,” said Assemblymember Miguel Santiago (D), who introduced the legislation.

The fourth bill was SB 1255, which is intended to fight discrimination in health care faced by people living with HIV.

The bill, entitled the Equal Insurance HIV Act, says that the life expectancy for HIV-positive people has nearly doubled since 1996 and requires that life and disability insurance for HIV-positive people be treated similarly to insurance for HIV-negative people.

It also requires insurance companies to get informed consent before testing for HIV and creates rules to keep the testing results confidential.

“I am very grateful for the support of my Senate and Assembly colleagues on this critical legislation,” said Sen. Lena Gonzalez (D), who introduced the bill, when it passed the state legislature earlier this month. “This is a huge step to ensure that Californians living with HIV and their families have equal access to life and disability income insurance coverage.”

SUICIDE LOSS

When a person dies by suicide, there is a void and unanswered questions for those for those left behind.  If you have survived a loss by suicide, we have created a help line for you.  You can share this number with anyone who may be dealing with suicide loss.  This is made possible through our grant from the Department of Health and Human Services.  Thank you Katie Perkins and Kelsey Kehoe for your work in suicide prevention.

1 833 LOSS UPC (567 7872)

If you are struggling and need help for yourself, someone is always listening.  Please reach out.  

  • National Suicide Prevention Hotline:  800-273-8255
  • Crisis Text Line: Text HOME to 741741
  • The Trevor Project: 866-488-7386
  • Download SafeUT app or call 833-372-3388

Please join our suicide loss support group on July 22 from 6:00 – 7:30 pm.  Please use this link to register.
https://forms.gle/jciSyBxMfAGG8VhE8

SOSA – SURVIVOR OF SUICIDE ATTEMPT

The Utah Pride Center welcomes you to join this online weekly check-in. This service is provided to all individuals who have attempted suicide. If you need support, someone to chat with, or resources, please join us virtually. We are here to help. We will meet Wednesday evenings from 5:30-6:30 pm. 

Please email Chanelle (she/her/hers) for any questions: chanellebuxton@utahpridecenter.org

 Registration Form

TECHNOLOGY HELP

If  you have technical questions about site security or how to connect to a virtual call or other questions, there is through Pride Center employees.   

Askageek@utahpridecenter.org (Questions answered by our webmaster Joni Weiss)

WHO CAN JOIN SAGE?

SAGE is designed for LGBT elders – people over 50.  However, if you are part of an inter-generational couple, both of you are still eligible to join.  If you have a  partner who has not joined because they are younger than 50, please have them send a request to be added to our membership list.  We  need name, zip code and email address sent to debhall@utahpridecenter.org. 

We will never check your id!  

Copyright © *2018* Utah Pride Center All rights reserved.
Our mailing address is:
PO Box 1078
SLC, UT 84110

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